https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtXNu_deUUI

Modbus is a serial communications protocol originally published by Modicon (now Schneider Electric) in 1979 for use with its programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Simple and robust, it has since become a de facto standard communication protocol and is now a commonly available means of connecting industrial electronic devices.[1] The main reasons for the use of Modbus in the industrial environment are:

developed with industrial applications in mind,
openly published and royalty-free,
easy to deploy and maintain,
moves raw bits or words without placing many restrictions on vendors.
Modbus enables communication among many devices connected to the same network, for example, a system that measures temperature and humidity and communicates the results to a computer. Modbus is often used to connect a supervisory computer with a remote terminal unit (RTU) in supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. Many of the data types are named from its use in driving relays: a single-bit physical output is called a coil, and a single-bit physical input is called a discrete input or a contact.

The development and update of Modbus protocols has been managed by the Modbus Organization[2] since April 2004, when Schneider Electric transferred rights to that organization.[3] The Modbus Organization is an association of users and suppliers of Modbus-compliant devices that seeks to drive the adoption and evolution of Modbus.[4]

Modbus RTU is an open, serial (RS-232 or RS-485) protocol derived from the Master/Slave architecture. It is a widely accepted protocol due to its ease of use and reliability. Modbus RTU is widely used within Building Management Systems (BMS) and Industrial Automation Systems (IAS). This wide acceptance is due in large part to MODBUS RTU’s ease of use.

MODBUS RTU messages are a simple 16-bit CRC (Cyclic-Redundant Checksum). The simplicity of these messages is to ensure reliability. Due to this simplicity, the basic 16-bit MODBUS RTU register structure can be used to pack in floating point, tables, ASCII text, queues, and other unrelated data.

Ref:

  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modbus
  • http://www.rtaautomation.com/technologies/modbus-rtu/
Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>